Omani Saidi Khanjar
Omani Saidi Khanjar with 7 silver rings
KHANJAR & BUCKLE

The Omani khanjar (dagger) is iconic of Oman. Which is illustrated by the fact that it is part of the Omani flag. Omani men still wear it on official occasions, however in recent years the wearing of Khanjars is declining as fewer young Omani men are wearing them. Below you find 17 examples of antique Omani khanjars, a knife (that sits behind the khanjar)  and Omani silver belt buckles. Many photos are included! The scabbard of an Omani khanjar is bent at an angle of 45 degree angel which differentiates it from the other daggers in the Middle East.The Khanjar blade is made of steel, the hilt is made of wood or horn (in some cases rhino horn) with silver ornaments, the scabbard is made of embroidery/gold thread or silver. The belt is is made of silver embroidery or brocade. There are typically 2, 4 or 7 silver rings on the khanjar. The antique clasps are cast in silver by using cuttlebone as a moult. In other words, many skills / techniques are required to produce an Omani khanjar and matching embroidered belt. From the very valuable anterior horn of a rhinoceros approx. only ten khanjar hilts could be produced.  Because of the Omani colonies, trade and influence outside Oman the Khanjar was used not just in Oman, but  also in Zanzibar, East Africa mainland and even the Comoros islands etc. The Khanjar was also a welcome present during official foreign visits hence there are photos of the King of Jordan wearing a golden Omani khanjar in the book by Elgood. So far it has not been possible to exactly  link the different styles of Khanjar to a particular region. Also no dedicated book or study exists regarding Omani khanjars, to our knowledge. Until puberty a boy will wear a silver buckle rather than a khanjar (see below for several good examples) The blades of old khanjars typically originate from Iran or Europe (not from Oman) see e.g. the old book by von Oppenheim. The British Museum in its description of the daggers and blades in the Ingrams collection, attributes these later blades to Sanaa in Yemen see e.g. blade BM 2012,6030.173. The inner side of the chape (top) of the scabbard we sometimes find a signature of the khanjar maker also sometimes floral symbols have been added on the back of which we do not know the meaning.

 Franz Stuhlmann in his book "Handwerk und industrie in Ost Afrika Hamburg 1910"

mentions that the silver filigree work does come from Oman and not from East Africa

 The best book on Zanzibar and East Africa for the second half of the 19th century is Land und Leute in Deutsch Ost Afrika  Berlin 1890. The text is by J.Wangemann and the beautiful illustrations based on original photos are by J.Sturz. Page 6 states in German that:  "The Omani swords are made in Lamu (Wituland)?? and the Saidi khanjars  are made in Muscat. The value of a Saidi  khanjar is at least 120 mark (a lot of money then) and these are difficult to obtain as they are primarily heirlooms"

Illustration from "Land und Leute in Deutsch-Ost-Afrika. Erinnerungen aus der ersten Zeit des Aufstandes und der Blokade " by J Wangemann (text) and J. Sturtz (photographs / illustrations) 1890. The above khanjars were conquered by German soldiers during the Arab uprising 1888-1890.

The Sa´idiyyah / Saidi Khanjar is  named after the Royal house of Al Said for which they are traditionally made, however they can also be worn by ordinary men. The story goes that Sultan Sa´iyd  bin Sultan had a Persian wife (which is true)  who became bored with her husbands dagger hilt and designed him a brighter one. Persian influence also seems to appear in the sophisticated design on the basal scabbard. The memoirs of princess Bibi Salme (Sultan Said's daughter)  has details on this flamboyant, wild and  adulterous Persian princess. Because of her behaviour Said bin Sultan divorced her and sent her back home.  The earliest photo with a Saidi khanjar is that of Sultan Seyd Madjid bin Said Sultan of Zanzibar (1856-1870) published in "zur geschichte des Deutschen handels mit Oastafrika  Teil 1 Wm Oswald & Co" page abb 40.

 The earliest T-shaped khanjar is illustrated  by  Guillain in  "Voyage a la cote orientale d´Afrique" based on photos (!)  taken around 1848. Wellsted in "Travels in Arabia" 1838 writes:  " The Jambir, or dagger , is usually about 10 inches in length and the haft, with those who can afford it, richly ornamented with gold" 

Already in the 1980´s the large majority of  antique khanjars offered in the souq´s were made up of the parts from different old khanjars and most frequently not even matching (and still very expensive) Several of the khanjars in this collection  came from Germans who worked / lived in East Africa and purchased them before the first world-war, so genuine old pieces and generally in unusual good (original) condition in particular the ones with gold-threat decoration.

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani Khanjar with Rhino hilt

Silver pins have been systematically hammered  into the hilt,  which makes it look like fish-scales

The Omani princess Emily Ruete writes in her book Memoirs of an Arabian Princess (German 1886 / English 1888):

 "As already mentioned repeatedly, weapons, of course, are part of the full dress of an Arab. They are usually handed to him by his wife, daughter or son when he prepares to go out"

 "The most favourite presents were all sorts of weapons. It may seem odd to European ladies that an Arab woman presents her husband, her brother, her grown-up son or her chosen one with costly weapons. But the Arabs consider weapons as their greatest luxury, they try to obtain any beautifully worked piece, and never have enough of them"

Antique Omani Khanjar

                                Fine Omani silver filigree work on an antique  Saidi khanjar
 
We are not aware of any dedicated book regarding antique khanjars covering types, design, origin and history. There is a series of Omani phone cards that shows the different types of khanjars, but most of the ones illustrated are relatively modern types.  A similar source is a website khanjar.om, but again mostly  modern khanjars. The best approach would be to inventorise and khanjars shown on 19th century photographs, but these photos are rather scarce.
 

The annual magazine A tribute to Oman edition 11 "Nizwa Portraits" page 158 -162 contains an interesting interview by Catherine Lonie with Ali bin Jabir al-Sulaimani who has been making high quality khanjars for 55 years. 

Antique Omani silver Khanjar 19th century

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Omani Khanjar

Very rare complete antique Omani khanjar with seven small rings.  Very Rare type with silver scabbard with classic driven flower design (perpetual movement) Similar to silver decoration on some high quality Martini Henri's.

Same design also on the back of a pair of very old Nizwa anklets (antal)  we have. 

The handle is made of very fine translucent rhino plus very fine silver ornaments and filigree.  Rare top quality antique item. 

 

Antique Omani khanjar

Antiuqe Omani khanjar

Antiuqe Omani khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

Arab name: Khanjar

Period: 1850-1900 Omani silver khanjar; Omani Khanjar

Origin: Oman

References:
  1. Robert Elgood. The Arms and Armour of Arabia  page 85.
  2. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233.
  3. Guillain Voyage a la cote orientale d´Afrique execute pendant les annees 1846, 1847, 1848. Sous le commandement  de M. Guillain capitage de fregate. Publie par ordre du gouvernement.
  4. Throw down the anchor The story of the Muttrah souq by Maxine Burden, centre for Omani dress, Muscat Media Group 2014 page 174-175 contains an interview with a modern Omani silversmith making khanjars.

Very old  Chinese object made of translucent Rhino horn (this Chinese object is NOT part of the collection described)

Antique Omani Baluchi silver Khanjar

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Omani Baluchi silver Khanjar

 

Very Rare antique Omani Baluchi  silver Khanjar.  However piece of silver missing on the back.  Genuine antique blade. Seller demonstrated the strength of the blade by cutting (to my horror) through a brass gun-cartridge!

Elgood (Ref 1) describes it as Persian Silver Khanjar, but the designs are Omani / Baluchi. Our website has several pieces of silver jewellery from Oman with identical decoration.  Beautiful and very rare in this quality. 

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique baluchi khanjar

 Omani silver khanjar  Antique Baluchi silver khanjar

Arab names: Antique Omani Baluchi silver Khanjar; Omani Khanjar

Period: 1800-1900

Origin:  Purchased in Muscat 30 years ago

References:
  1. Robert Elgood. The Arms and Armour of Arabia  page p 88 fig 9.38 (photo second khanjar from left)

A collection of antique Omani khanjar belts

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Omani khanjar belt

The Khanjar belt is referred to as hizam or hizaq.

The first 8 antique belts are woven from silk, cotton or silver threads, they contain geometric patters (raqma) that are also found in traditional Omani rugs, camel bags and camel trappings.  The Raqma is sometimes not woven but embroidered with wool.

The bottom 4 belts are made of leather encrusted with strips made of silver and sometimes include a decoration made of strips of gold. These belts are less old than the first 8 woven belts.

The khanjars are fixed to the belt with leather strips which are looped through the outer rings and fasted with decorative button headed pins (one with the emblem of Oman incorporating a khanjar and swords) . The leather strips are also decorated with the same threats the belt is woven from (see belt 5)

The scabbard of khanjars with seven silver rings is connected with a chain and pin to the belt. The entry point of the pin  into the belt should be  covered with a little shield.  

Omani khanjar belt

Antique Omani khanjar belt

Antique Omani khanjar belt

Antique Omani khanjar belt

Antique Omani khanjar belt

Antique Omani khanjar belt

Antique Omani khanjar belt

Antique Omani khanjar belt

Antique Omani silver khanjar belt

Antique Omani silver khanjar belt

Antique Omani silver khanjar belt

antique Omani belt

Different silver utensils e.g. tweezers, kohlpots, bullet pouches and gunpowder primers (all in the shape of weapons) were hung from the belt.

We do not know the origin of the gold-threat used.  During the late 19th century gold and silver threat from Aleppo was sold in the Jeddah and Mecca souqs (Ref 2 page 129) but we do not know if this was  also the case in Oman. From Ref 1 page 29 we know that 40 years ago metallic yarns of gold and silver were imported to Oman from Japan. However it is still possible that the metallic yarns used in antique belts and khanjars were still made in Oman.

References:
  1. Traditional Spinning and Weaving in the Sultanate of Oman by Gigi Crocker Jones published by the Historical society of Oman 1989
  2. Western Arabia in the Leiden collections traces of a colourful past by Luitgard Mols and Arnoud Vrolijk, Leiden Publications 2016

 

Antique Omani silver Al Saidi Khanjar / Royal khanjar

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Saidi Khanjar

Rare complete and antique Omani Sa'idiyyah Khanjar / Royal Khanjar.  Seven thick rings, extensive filigree work.  Rhino and silver hilt.  Contemporary silver buckle with tree of life motive. No textile / woven band.  This khanjar has 7 rings.

Ref 2 Stuhlmann 1910 mentions that these khanjars generally have inferior blades (bought very cheaply in Solingen) thereby defusing the myth that old Omani khanjars normally had high quality blades. Ref 2 Stuhlmann 1910 p127 also refers to the filigree silver work on the khanjars, curved silver powder horns and silver tubes (in bandoleers) that used were used in the past by the irregular soldiers of the Sultan. He also mentions that these khanjars were normally not made in Zanzibar.

  Antique Omani silver Khanjar

Antique Omani silver buckle

Antique Omani khanjar

 Antique Omani khanjar

Arab names: Sa'idiyyah Khanjar; Saidi Khanjar; Omani Khanjar

Period: 1840-1900

Origin: Oman, however these khanjars were also worn in Zanzibar and East Africa. Even some tribes on Commore Islands wear them.

References:
  1. Ernst Hieke, zur geschichte des Deutschen handels mit Oastafrika Teil 1 Wm Oswald & Co" page abb 40 1939. Earliest picture of Sultan Madjid with a Saidi khanjar
  2. Stuhlmann handwerk und industrie in Ostafrika Friederichsen & Co Hamburg 1910 page 127 abbildung69
  3. Ruth Hawley Silver the traditional art of Oman 2000 p 16 above left
  4. Robert Elgood The Arms and armour of Arabia  page 81 fig 9.26
  5. Jehan S Rajab Silver Jewellery of Oman p 26;45
  6. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-23 Vol 2 p 452; J.L. Carter Tribes in Oman Peninsular publishing 1982 page 2
  7. Catalog of the Oman exhibition in the Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam 2009 page 157 and the front-cover!
  8. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz p 119, 131
  9. Islamic Art in Oman page 326 and 327
  10. Unsheathing the Omani Khunjar by Robert Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day page 110-115

Antique Omani Al Saidi Khanjar / Royal khanjar

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Saidi Khanjar

Rare complete and antique Omani Sa'idiyyah Khanjar / Royal khanjar.

Rhino horn hilt embellished with silver rosettes, filigree work, granulation, wire-work, beaded wire. The dagger sheath is made of wood encased in leather and wrapped in silver thread, with plaques of silver wire-work,  granulation and beaded wire. 

The dagger sheath has four large silver rings (and three linked smaller ones) which are hooked on a woven textile belt with a silver buckle, so seven rings in total. The belt is woven from gold or silver threat. The old buckle is cast from silver using cuttlefish-shell (see pattern on the back of the buckle)

Compare the one in the British museum Ingrams collection. Ref 2 Stuhlmann 1910 mentions that these khanjars generally have inferior blades (bought very cheaply in Solingen) thereby defusing the myth that old Omani khanjars normally had high quality blades. Ref 2 Stuhlmann 1910 page 127 also refers to the filigree silver work on the khanjars, curved silver powder horns and silver tubes (in bandoleers) that used were used in the past by the irregular soldiers of the Sultan. He also mentions that these khanjars were normally not made in Zanzibar but in Arabia

 Antique Omani siver khanjar

Antique Omani Khanjar

Antique Omani Khanjar 

 Antique Omani khanjar

 

 

Arab names: Sa'idiyyah Khanjar ; Saidi Khanjar ; Omani Khanjar

Period: 1850-1900

Origin: Oman

References:
  1. Ernst Hieke, zur geschichte des Deutschen handels mit Oastafrika Teil 1 Wm Oswald & Co" page abb 40 1939. Earliest picture of Sultan Madjid with a Saidi khanjar
  2. Stuhlmann handwerk und industrie in Ostafrika Friederichsen & Co Hamburg 1910 page 127 abbildung69
  3. Ruth Hawley Silver the traditional art of Oman 2000 p 16 above left
  4. Robert Elgood The Arms and armour of Arabia  page 81 fig 9.26
  5. Jehan S Rajab Silver Jewellery of Oman p 26;45
  6. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-23 Vol 2 p 452; J.L. Carter Tribes in Oman Peninsular publishing 1982 page 2
  7. Catalog of the Oman exhibition in the Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam 2009 page 157 and the front-cover!
  8. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz p 119, 131
  9. Islamic Art in Oman page 326 and 327
  10. Unsheathing the Omani Khunjar by Robert Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day page 110-115
  11. British Museum has similar item reg: 2012,6030.135.a-b from the Harold Ingrams collection. Dating 1880-1920.Height: 35 cm. Length: 110 cm. Weight: 983 grammes; Steel dagger (khanjar) with a horn hilt embellished with silver rosettes, filigree work, granulation, wire-work and beaded wire. The dagger-sheath is made of wood, encased in leather and wrapped in silver thread, with plaques of silver wire-work, granulation and beaded wire. The dagger-sheath has four large silver rings attached to it, which are hooked on a silver buckle and woven textile belt. The sheath and belt are lined on the back with a soft black textile
  12. The National Museum of Oman Highlights published by Scala Arts & Heritage publishers in  2016 page 8

Traditional Antique Omani silver Saidi Sa´idiyyah style Khanjar dagger

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Omani silver Khanjar

 

Rare complete Omani khanjar. Four light rings. The handle of Rhino and silver ornaments on the top part identical to the Saidi khanjar. This khanjar has 4 silver rings.

The bottom part woven with gold wire ( a lost art form) The Textile belt is original but very worn. Old blade.

 

 Antique Omani silver Khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

 Antique Omani khanjar 

Arab name: Omani khanjar

Period: 1850-1920

Origin: Oman Zanzibar

We do not know the origin of the gold-threat used.  During the late 19th century gold and silver threat from Aleppo was sold in the Jeddah and Mecca souqs (ref 5 page 129) but we do not know if this was  also the case in Oman.

References:
  1. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233
  2. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 p45
  3. Robert Elgood The Arms and armour of Arabia page 84 fig 9.28 (in gold) page 88 fig 9.38
  4. Ernst Hieke, zur geschichte des Deutschen handels mit Oastafrika Teil 1 Wm Oswald & Co" page abb 40 1939. Earliest picture of Sultan Madjid with a Saidi khanjar
  5. Western Arabia in the Leiden collections traces of a colourful past by Luitgard Mols and Arnoud Vrolijk, Leiden Publications 2016 page 129
  6. Charles Buttin Le catalogue de la collection d'armes ancienneseuropéennes et orientales"1933 The above  khanjar is identical to the khanjar numbered 980. This collection was collected mostly before 1900.

 

Antique Omani khanjar Buttin

 

 

Antique Omani Saidi Khanjar

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Rare complete and antique Omani Sa'idiyyah Khanjar / Royal Khanjar.  Seven thick rings, extensive filigree work.  Rhino and silver hilt.  Contemporary silver buckle with tree of life motive. No textile / woven band.  This khanjar has 7 rings. two pieces of silver missing from the hilt.

 Antique Omani khanjar

Ref 2 Stuhlmann 1910 mentions that these khanjars generally have inferior blades (bought very cheaply in Solingen) thereby defusing the myth that old Omani khanjars normally had high quality blades. Ref 2 Stuhlmann 1910 p127 also refers to the filigree silver work on the khanjars, curved silver powder horns and silver tubes (in bandoleers) that used were used in the past by the irregular soldiers of the Sultan. He also mentions that these khanjars were normally not made in Zanzibar.

Antique Omni silver buckle

Antique Omani silver Khanjar

 Antique Omani khanjar

Arab names: Sa'idiyyah Khanjar; Saidi Khanjar; Omani Khanjar

Period: 1840-1900

Origin: Oman, however these khanjars were also worn in Zanzibar and East Africa. Even some tribes on Commore Islands wear them.

Antique Omani silver khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

References:
  1. Ernst Hieke, zur geschichte des Deutschen handels mit Oastafrika Teil 1 Wm Oswald & Co" page abb 40 1939. Earliest picture of Sultan Madjid with a Saidi khanjar
  2. Stuhlmann handwerk und industrie in Ostafrika Friederichsen & Co Hamburg 1910 page 127 abbildung69
  3. Ruth Hawley Silver the traditional art of Oman 2000 p 16 above left
  4. Robert Elgood The Arms and armour of Arabia  page 81 fig 9.26
  5. Jehan S Rajab Silver Jewellery of Oman p 26;45
  6. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-23 Vol 2 p 452; J.L. Carter Tribes in Oman Peninsular publishing 1982 page 2
  7. Catalog of the Oman exhibition in the Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam 2009 page 157 and the front-cover!
  8. Traditional silver jewellery and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz p 119, 131
  9. Islamic Art in Oman page 326 and 327
  10. Unsheathing the Omani Khunjar by Robert Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day page 110-115

Traditional antique Omani silver Khanjar dagger

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Omani Khanjar

Common antique Omani khanjar with four silver rings. Black leather with woven silver wire.

Rhino handle and plain silver silver fitting. Some filigree work. The belt is very narrow: (2,5 cm) and woven from silver thread / wire  and with geometrical patterns. This khanjar has four silver rings.

The buckle is very small and cast from a shell (i.e. it is a genuine old one) The old blade affected by rust.

The third photo in the slide show illustrates a later example of this type of khanjar being given by / to Colonel Watson of the Trucial Oman Scouts, operating in Oman and the Emirates during the 1950's This photo is part of our collection.

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

Trucial Oman Scouts Khanjar

Omani khanjar's have always been welcome presents for expatiates

This photo in our collection from the 1950's shows a khanjar being given to a British member (Colonel Watson?) of the Trucial Oman Levies / Scouts,  taken in the later United Arab Emirates. As you can see on the photo the cap badge of the Trucial Oman Scouts featured crossed khanjars.

The Trucial Oman Levies  were the internal security force formed with British army officers in 1951 and renamed Trucial Oman Scouts in 1956.

Arab name: Omani Khanjar

Period: 1890-1950

Origin: Oman

References:
  1. Robert Elgood. The Arms and armour of Arabia page 94 fig 9.42
  2. Catalog Oman exhibition 2009 Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam p 145 and 121 & 144
  3. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233
  4. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 p 25
  5. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz p 125
  6. Arab & Islamic Silver by Saad Al-Jadir 1981  Stacey International  p 112-115
  7. Michael Mann .The Trucial Oman Scouts The story of a Bedouin Force published by Michael Russell 1994.

Traditional antique Omani silver khanjar / dagger, the rhino hilt with silver pins in fish-scale pattern

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Omani Khanjar

Rare complete and antique Omani Khanjar. This khanjar has four silver  rings. The gold threat decoration is very beautiful and vulnerable. Top filigree silver work. On the handle two thin golden ornaments with filigreeing.

The translucent rhino horn is very old as the colour is tending towards beautiful brown reddish  (compare ancient rhino cups) In the handle hundreds of tiny silver pins have been beaten into the rhino horn and as the heads are overlapping it gives the impression of fish-scales. The slide-show contains a 19th century photo of an Omani with a similar khanjar.

Antique Omani khanjar  

 Antique Omani khanjar

Khanjar almost identical to ours (19th century photo)

Antique Omani khanjar

 Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

The very old rhino horn is translucent

Arab name: Omani Khanjar

Period: 1850-1900

Origin: Oman Zanzibar 

References:
  1. Robert Elgood. The Arms and armour of Arabia. Similar rhino handle with silver pins and golden ornaments on page 85
  2. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233
  3. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 p 25
  4. Unsheating the Omani Khunjar by Rober Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day page 110-115. Discusses khanjar with rhino handle with silver pins (like fish-scales)
  5. Guillain Voyage a la cote orientale d´Afrique execute pendant les annees 1846, 1847, 1848. Sous le commandement de M. Guillain capitage de fregate. Publie par ordre du gouvernement
  6. Charles Buttin Le catalogue de la collection d'armes anciennes, européennes et orientales"1933 The above  khanjar is identical to the khanjar numbered 979. This collection was collected mostly before 1900. He describes this type of khanjar as rare.

Antique Omani khanjar Charles Buttin

 

Traditional Antique Omani silver Khanjar / dagger

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Antique Omani Khanjar

 

Rare complete and antique Omani Khanjar.

Seven rings, the gold thread is very beautiful and vulnerable. Translucent rhino horn handle with silver pins forming a fish-scale pattern. Some bands of silver filigree. This khanajar has 6 silver rings but the scabbard is not connected with a chain to the belt. Rest of Khanjar covered with beautiful gold thread  (lost Art) Original blade.

 

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani silver khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani silver khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani silver khanjar

Khanjar Necklace: What happened to the person that originally was wearing the khanjar?

Author / Publisher: Antique Omani silver Khanjar; Omani Khanjar

Period: 1850-1920

Origin: Oman Zanzibar

References:
  1. Robert Elgood. The Arms and armour of Arabia. Similar rhino handle with silver pins and golden ornaments on page 85
  2. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233
  3. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 p 25
  4. Unsheating the Omani Khunjar by Robert Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day page 110-115. Discusses khanjar with rhino handle with silver pins (like fish-scales)
  5. Guillain Voyage a la cote orientale d´Afrique execute pendant les annees 1846, 1847, 1848. Sous le commandement de M. Guillain capitage de fregate. Publie par ordre du gouvernement
  6. Charles Buttin Le catalogue de la collection d'armes anciennes, européennes et orientales" 1933 The above  khanjar is identical to the khanjar numbered 979. This collection was collected mostly before 1900. He describes this type of khanjar as rare.

antique Omani khanjar

 

Traditional small Antique Omani Khanjar with maker signature & floral symbol on the back

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Antique Omani Khanjar

 

Rare complete and  antique  small Omani or Saudi (boys) Khanjar with seven silver rings. Rhino grip. Silver filigree. Signature of silversmith on the back of the chape. Also a floral emblem / symbol  on the back, this could be linked to particular Omani tribe, but we are not sure. Old blade. 27 cm high. This is definitely an old khanjar, the edges of the silver decoration are heavily corroded.

Note that the filigree elements form a string of wire and are not tiny individual elements like in the older khanjars. Once the silversmith has positioned all these elements the entire  khanjar component  is heated and all the tiny elements are permanently fixed to the khanjar component. Therefore we can conclude that it is much easier to make this type of filigree.

Omani silver Khanjar

omani silver khanjar  

Antique Omani khanjar

Name:Antique Omani Khanjar with maker signature & floral symbol on the back: Omani Khanjar

Period: 1850-1900

Origin: Purchased in Nizwa Oman over 35 years ago;  This type was made around Ibri In Oman but also in Saudi and the Emirates.

Sir Donald Hawley describes and illustrates new (1970's) examples of this type of khanjar as Omani in his book Oman & its Renaissance (ref 6) The Omani weapons expert Robert Richmond (ref 4) describes this type as Omani.

The important and reliable book Tribes in Oman by JRL Carter  (ref 5) describes an almost identical  khanjar of this type on page 161 as Omani and names the silversmith as Sayf b. Hamad al Shaybaniy of Ibri. However he also says “In form it is typical of the  Dhahirah region of Oman  and shows strong affinities with the daggers produced in the area of the United Arab Emirates. Those more typical of Oman have handles made of ivory of giraffe horn (assume Rhino) and the scabbard of the Omani ones is of woven silver thread”  I believe mine have Rhino “handles”, identical  to the old Saidi khanjars in my collection. Giraffe is the Arab work for rhino.

 A 1991 Saudi exhibition catalogue of the King Faisal Center with the title Weapons of the Islamic world (ref 7) , describes on page 56 are again identical khanjars described as “Doojaniyan” daggers. The silver scabbards are set with fine silver beads , and the hilts are in rhinoceros horn. Al-ahsa (Saudi Arabia)” 

Antique Omani Khanjar

A reader of our website Abdullatif Ali Al Nakkas identified the signature on the back of the chape  as Abdul Majid al Dajani (Aldajani family had many workers) a famous Saudi Maker from al Hasa region whose work is legendary that the type is called Doujani, a variant of his name by many southern Saudis. 

A similar khanjar with the same signature on the back of the chape was sold in  Imperial Inc Auctions lot 410 march 21 2015. The floral emblem on the back of the handle  seems to be slightly different, the meaning of this floral emblem is unclear (maybe a tribal symbol) The signature on the khanjar in the auction is identical to the above one in our website. This auction identifies the signature on the khanjar as "Abd al Madalrajan??" and dates it to the second half of the 19th century. They identify the khanjar as Omani. See photos in our photo slideshow.

The Saidi khanjar was produced and worn in Oman, but was also worn by Omani Arabs in East Africa and even by Arabs in Madagascar. Similar it seems that the above khanjar was worn in Oman, the Emirates and part of Saudi Arabia. From Sir Donald Hawley we know for certain  that this type  was also produced in Ibri (Oman) in by silversmith Hamad al Shaybany well into the 20th century. However other locations of production incl Emirates are most likely.

References:
  1. Robert Elgood. The Arms and armor of Arabia See page 82 for an identical 19th century one. Also the boy on page 72
  2. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233
  3. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz p 130
  4. Unsheating the Omani Khunjar by Rober Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day page 110-115
  5. JRL Carter Tribes in Oman
  6. Sir Donald Hawley, Oman and its renaissance
  7.  Saudi exhibition catalogue King Faisal Center: Weapons of the Islamic world 1991 describes on page 56 are again identical khanjars described as “Doojaniyan” daggers
  8. Guillain Voyage a la cote orientale d´Afrique execute pendant les annees 1846, 1847, 1848. Sous le commandement de M. Guillain capitage de fregate. Publie par ordre du gouvernement

 

Antique Omani silver Al Saidi / Sa´idiyyah style Khanjar / Dagger

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Omani Khanjar

 

Rare complete and antique Omani Sa'idiyyah Khanjar.  The dagger has four silver rings, Rhino handle. Filigree work.  Blade probably old. Length 33 cm.  The khanjar is in extremely good condition with all parts original and matching. The antique belt has a nice decoration (raqma). Again rare to find such an old khanjar with the original gold threat still in place.

 Antique Omani khanjar

  Antique Omani silver khanjarAntique Omani khanjar

very old chinese object made of rhino horn

Very old Chinese artefact made of rhino horn

This photo and object are not part of the collection described

Antique Omani silver 

antique Omani khanjar

 Antique Omani Khanjar

This Muscat Dallah (probably  made by an Indian craftsman given the detailed decoration) and Omani Khanjar were presented on behalf of the Omani Sultan to the commander / admiral of a British fleet visiting Muscat during the 1930's.

Arab name: Saidi Sa'idiyyah Khanjar ; Omani Khanjar

Period: 1850-1920

Origin: Oman Zanzibar

References:
  1. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233
  2. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 page 26 (in the middle)
  3. Ernst Hieke, zur geschichte des Deutschen handels mit Oastafrika Teil 1 Wm Oswald & Co" page abb 40 1939. Earliest picture of Sultan Madjid with a Saidi khanjar
  4. Charles Buttin Le catalogue de la collection d'armes anciennes, européennes et orientales"1933 The above khanjar is identical to the khanjar numbered 980. This collection was collected mostly before 1900. He describes this type of khanjar as very rare.

antique Omani khanjar

 

Antique Omani silver Khanjar with chape signature and floral symbol on the back

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Omani Khanjar

Rare complete Omani Khanjar with seven heavy rings T shaped Rhino hilt with a shiny silver plate. Heavily covered with silver and filigree.  On the back an emblem and a signature of the silversmith. The emblem could be linked to a particular tribe, but we are not sure. Height 32 cm.

 Khanjars like this were still made in the Sharqiya as late as the 1970´s. See e.g. the book by Sir Donald Hawley (1987) page 137 top left for a brand new one.

 Antique Omani khanjar

 

Arab name: Omani Khanjar; Antique Omani silver Khanjar with signature and floral symbol on the back

Period: 1900-1970 

Origin: Oman Zanzibar From the Sharqiyah region according to ref 7 page 113  Robert Richmond

Origin: Purchased in Nizwa Oman over 35 years ago;  This type was made around Ibri In Oman but also apparently  in the Emirates and maybe Saudi Arabia.

Sir Donald Hawley describes and illustrates new examples of this type of khanjar as Omani in his book Oman & its Renaissance (ref 1) The Omani weapons expert Robert Richmond (ref 4) describes this type as Omani.

The important and reliable book Tribes in Oman by JRL Carter  (ref 5) describes them on page 161 as Omani and he names the silversmith as Sayf b. Hamad al Shaybaniy of Ibri as the maker of his khanjar.  Carter knew the silversmith personally. However he also says “In form it is typical of the  Dhahirah region of Oman  and shows strong affinities with the daggers produced in the area of the United Arab Emirates. Those more typical of Oman have handles made of ivory of giraffe horn (giraffe is the Arab word for rhino horn) and the scabbard of the Omani ones is of woven silver thread” . The handle of the above khanjar is made of Rhino horn, identical  to the old Saidi khanjars in my collection.

 A 1991 Saudi exhibition catalogue of the King Faisal Center with the title "Weapons of the Islamic world " (ref 3) , shows on page 56 identical khanjars described as “Doojaniyan” daggers. The silver scabbards are set with fine silver beads , and the hilts are in rhinoceros horn. Al-ahsa (Saudi Arabia)

A reader of our website Abdullatif Ali Al Nakkas identified the signature on the back of the chape  as Abdul Majid al Dajani. The Aldajani family had many workers. He is a famous Saudi arms maker from the al Hasa region whose work is legendary, and work of this type is called Doujani, a variant of his name by many southern Saudis. 

A similar khanjar with the same signature was sold in  Imperial Inc Auctions lot 410 march 21 2015. The floral emblem on the back of the handle  seems to be slightly different, the meaning of this floral emblem is unclear (maybe a tribal symbol) The signature on the khanjar in the auction is identical to the above one in our website. This auction identifies the signature on the khanjar as "Abd al Madalrajan?" and dates it to the second half of the 19th century. They identify the khanjar as Omani. See photos in our photo-slideshow.

Another type of khanjar the "Saidi khanjar" was produced and worn in Oman, but was also worn by Omani Arabs in East Africa and even by Arabs in Madagascar. Similar it seems that the above T-shaped khanjar was worn in Oman, the Emirates and southern part of Saudi Arabia. From JRL Carter and Sir Donald Hawley we know for certain  that this type  was also produced in Oman e.g. in Ibri by silversmith Hamad al Shaybany in Ibri  well into the 20th century. However it it is feasible that there may have been other locations of production including the Emirates and Southern Saudi Arabia.

 References:
  1. Oman & its Renaissance Sir Donald Hawley 1987 page 137
  2. The arms and armour of Arabia by Elgood 1994 page 82
  3. Weapons of the Islamic world Exhibition catalog King Feisal center Riyadh 1991 page 56 attributes this type of khanjar to Saudi Arabia
  4. Islamic art in Oman page 329 pict 11
  5. JRL Carter Tribes in oman Peninsular publishing page 161
  6. Unsheating the Omani Khunjar by Rober Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day page 110-115 (same khanjar on page 110 and 113

Antique Omani silver Khanjar (incomplete) with chape signature of the maker

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Antique Omani silver Khanjar (incomplete) with chape signature of the maker

 

 

Rare but incomplete Omani khanjar. Poor quality khanjar.

The leather parts largely gone. Needs restoration. On the back of the chape (top of the scabbard) you find a signature. A reader of our website identified the signature possibly as Hassan and Ahmed AlDayen, two famous Saudi makers from Hafouf. These are related to AlDajani family

 

  antique Omani khanjar

 

Arab name: Omani Khanjar; Antique Omani silver Khanjar (incomplete) with chape signature of the maker.

 

Period: 1900-1970

 

Origin: Oman: Sharqia / Dhahirah region. (Carter refers to a similar one made by the silversmith Sayf bin Hamad al Shabaniy of Ibri

 References:
  1. Omani Silver Ruth Hawley 1978 section on Khanjars. Richardson & Dorr
  2. The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233
  3. J.L. Carter Tribes in Oman Peninsular publishing 1982 page 135; page 161
  4. Weapons of the Islamic world Exhibition catalog King Feisal center Riyadh 1991 page 56 attributes this type of khanjar to Saudi Arabia
  5. Unsheating the Omani Khunjar by Rober Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day page 110-115 (same khanjar on page 110 and 113
  6. Unsheating the Omani Khunjar by Rober Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day

Traditional Omani antique silver Saidi Khanjar / dagger

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Rare complete antique four ring khanjar. With a lot of gold-threat.

 

 

 

Antique Omani silver khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

 Antique Omani silver khanjar

Arab name: Khanjar

Period: 1850-1920: Saidi Khanjar ; Omani Khanjar

Origin: Oman Zanzibar

References:
  1. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 p 26 (in the middle)
  2. Ernst Hieke, zur geschichte des Deutschen handels mit Oastafrika Teil 1 Wm Oswald & Co" page abb 40 1939. Earliest picture of Sultan Madjid with a Saidi khanjar
  3. Charles Buttin Le catalogue de la collection d'armes anciennes, européennes et orientales"1933 This khanjar is identical to the khanjar numbered 980. This collection was collected mostly before 1900. He describes this type of khanjar as very rare.

Antique Omani khanjar Buttin

 

Antique Omani silver Khanjar with very old wooden silver? inlaid hilt.

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Omani Khanjar

 

Common Omani Khanjar with four silver rings and an antique wooden hilt inlaid with silver or lead.  The hilt is very old.

 

 

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

 

Antique Omani Wooden hilt

 

Antique Omani khanjar

 Antique Omani Khanjar

Arab name: khanjar

Period: 1900-1970

Origin: Oman Zanzibar

References:

  1. Omani Silver Ruth Hawley 1978 section on Khanjars.
  2. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman volume 1 222-233
  3. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz p 124
  4. Arab & Islamic Silver by Saad Al-Jadir 1981  Stacey International page 90-91
  5. British Museum on-line collection number: 2010,6003.2.a.b length 30 cm Also reg.2011,6004.2   71 cm long. Boy's brown leather belt lined with green felt and embroidered with silver thread in a grid pattern. Also includes silver embellishments in diamond shapes
  6. Oman and its Renaissance  by Sir Donald Hawley Stacey International London 1987 page 134 / 135

     

    Below you find a UAE You-tube film with a similar more modern Omani khanjar with the woven silver decoration:

 

Antique Omani Khanjar (identical to illustration in the book by Oppenheim in 1900) also similar to khanjar in book Guillain.

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Omani Khanjar

Very rare antique khanjar with two rings. Unusual simple (cheap) Omani Khanjar with wooden hilt inlaid with silver or lead. The hilt is very old. It has a minimum of silver.

An identical khanjar from around 1895 is illustrated in Ref 1 (see bottom khanjar on the photo in the slide-show) named "Maskat dolche (Muscat Dagger) Von Oppenheim writes in 1899 about the swords and daggers he sees in the souq in Muscat: " Man sieht schone Waffen, die langen schwerten ohne handschutz mit auffallend langen griff, krumme, als Gurtel zu tragende Dolche mit vorzuglicher Silberarbeit, deren klingen meist aus Europa und Persien bezogen werden" Apparently the majority of blades come from Europe or from Persia.

Antique Omani khanjar

 

Antique omani Khanjar Oppenheim

Similar khanjar from Muscat illustrated in the book by von Oppenheim  in his book published in 1899 (ref 1)

 

Antique Omani silver khanjar

Unusual antique Omani wooden hilt with silver pins

Arab name: khanjar

Period: 1890-19??

Origin: Oman Zanzibar

References:
  1. Vom Mittelmeer zum Persischen Golf. Vol 1 & vol 2 by the archaeologist von Oppenheim in 1899 page 326 and 327
  2. Omani Silver Ruth Hawley 1978 section on Khanjars
  3. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233
  4. Guillain Voyage a la cote orientale d´Afrique execute pendant les annees 1846, 1847, 1848. Sous le commandement de M. Guillain capitage de fregate. Publie par ordre du gouvernement

Antique Omani Khanjar

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Omani Khanjar

 

 

Rare antique Omani khanjar with a T-shaped horn hilt. The khanjar  has seven rings and the filigree work is of high quality  The hilt is not made of rhino and may be of later date. The vertical decorated band on the right of the scabbard is particularly fine and unusual. 

 

 

 

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

Arab name: Khanjar

Period: 1900-1950

Origin: Oman Zanzibar

References:
  1. Omani Silver Ruth Hawley 1978 section on Khanjars.
  2. Richardson & Dorr The craft and Heritage of Oman vol 1 222-233

Antique Omani Al Saidi Khanjar

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Antique Omani silver khanjar

Rare complete antique Omani Sa'idiyyah Khanjar / Royal khanjar with seven silver rings, extensive filigree work. Rhino and silver hilt. Woven antique belt of cotton with decorations.

Ref 2 Stuhlmann 1910 mentions that these khanjars generally have inferior blades (bought very cheaply in Solingen) thereby defusing the myth that old Omani khanjars normally had high quality blades. Ref 2 Stuhlmann 1910 page 127 also refers to the filigree silver work on the khanjars, curved silver powder horns and silver tubes (in bandoleers) that used were used in the past by the irregular soldiers of the Sultan. He also mentions that these khanjars were normally not made in Zanzibar but in Arabia.

 

Antique Omani khanjar

Antique Omani khanjar

 Antique Omani silver khanjar

Back view of the khanjar

Antique omani silver khanjar

Arab name: Saidi Khanjar; Omani Khanjar

Period: 1850-1920

Origin:Oman Zanzibar

References:
  1. Ernst Hieke, zur geschichte des Deutschen handels mit Oastafrika Teil 1 Wm Oswald & Co" page abb 40 1939. Earliest picture of Sultan Madjid with a Saidi khanjar
  2. Stuhlmann handwerk und industrie in Ostafrika Friederichsen & Co Hamburg 1910 page 127 abbildung 69
  3. J.L. Carter Tribes in Oman Peninsular publishing 1982 page 23
  4. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 p 25
  5. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz p 119, 131
  6. Islamic Art in OmaUnsheating the Omani Khunjar by Robert Richmond in A Tribute to Oman Volume IX 20th National Day page 110-115
  7. British Museum on-line Ingram collection Khanjar 2012,6030.135.a-b. 1880-1920. Steel dagger (khanjar) with a horn hilt embellished with silver rosettes, filigree work, granulation, wirework and beaded wire. The dagger-sheath is made of wood, encased in leather and wrapped in silver thread, with plaques of silver wirework, granulation and beaded wire. The dagger-sheath has four large silver rings attached to it, which are hooked on a silver buckle and woven textile belt. The sheath and belt are lined on the back with a soft black textile

Small Knife (Sikkin) the bone hilt decorated with silver wire normally, fitted behind a khanjar

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Small knife

 

Common but rare in this quality. Small antique knife (Sikkin) decorated with silver wire that is fitted behind a khanjar.  

Silver wire wrapped around two pieces of bone / ivory. Blade rusty /b roken but handle very finely made.  These high quality antique knifes are rare. 

These knifes are typically  fitted into a leather sheath on the back of the khanjar.

    Antique Omani knifeAntique Omani knife

Antique Omani silver knife

Arab Name: Sikkin

Period: 1850-1920

Origin: Oman

References:
  1.  Ruth Hawley Silver the traditional Art of Oman (the 2000 edition) p 71
  2. Oman exhibition Amsterdam catalog 2009 page 157 ; 
  3. Oman and its Renaissance  by Sir Donald Hawley Stacey International London 1987 page 138 photo with similar item
  4.  The craft heritage of Oman Vol 2 Richardson & Dorr p 451 item 095
  5. The National Museum of Oman Highlights published by Scala Arts & Heritage publishers in  2016 page 8

Antique Omani silver Buckle for a boy (Ibsim)

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Antique Omani silver Buckle

 

Common silver buckle. Before a boy is old enough to wear a khanjar (10-12 years old), he wears a silver buckle.

Antique Omani silver buckle

Arab name: Ibsim / Ibzim

Period: 1900-1950

Origin: worn by boys all over Oman

References:
  1. Ruth Hawley. Omani silver (first edition) page 3.
  2. The craft heritage of Oman Volume 2 p. 448 item 078
  3. Oman Adorned by Pauline Shelton Robert Richmond / Apex London 1997 page 112 
  4. Disappearing treasures of Oman 1998 by Avelyn Foster pages 89, 91
  5. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 page 24
  6. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz page 145
  7. British Museum similar item: 2009,6023.192; Length: 11.5 centimetres (including small buckle); Width: 4.7 centimetres; Weight: 93 grammes; Silver belt-buckle (ibzim) for boys up to the age of 10 or 12. Shaped as a rectangle with two pointed ends. Chased decoration on the front with symmetrical patterns of curling vine-leaves enclosed within pentagon-shapes, and a vertical plaque with zigzag decoration in the centre. The back has silver fixings and a smaller buckle (perhaps missing a pin). To be worn attached to a leather belt. Northern Oman.

Antique Omani silver Buckles for a boy (Ibsim)

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Antique Omani silver Buckle

 

Rare silver buckle. Before a boy is old enough to wear a khanjar, he wears a silver buckle

 Omnis silver buckle

Arab name: Ibsim

Period: 1850-1950

Origin: worn by boys all over Oman

References:
  1. Ruth Hawley. Omani silver (first edition) page 3
  2. The craft heritage of Oman Volume 2 p. 448 item 078 
  3.  Oman Adorned by Pauline Shelton  Robert Richmond / Apex London 1997  page  112 
  4. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 page 24 
  5. Disappearing treasures of Oman 1998 by Avelyn Foster page 89, 91
  6. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz page 145
  7. The Wereld Museum has a similar buckle. h 5,8 Weight 80 grams. Ex collection Smith/ Hutschenruyter. Inventory 77077. De meeste van dit type voorwerpen zijn versierd met het bladmotief, dat zo karakteristiek is voor de zilversmeden in Ibri. Zie: Forster, Avelyn ; Disappearing treasures of Oman
  8.  Ethnic jewellery from Africa, Asia and Pacific Islands. The René van der Star Collection ; Amsterdam/Singapore; Pepin Press ; 2002 ; p. 55, boven
  9. British Museum similar item: 2009,6023.189; Length: 14 centimetres (point to point) Width: 6 centimetres; Weight: 103 grammes; Silver belt-buckle (ibzim) for boys up to the age of 10 or 12. Shaped as a rectangle with two pointed ends. Chased decoration on the front with symmetrical patterns of curling vine-leaves enclosed within pentagon-shapes, and a vertical plaque with zigzag decoration in the centre. The back has silver fixings and a smaller buckle (perhaps missing a pin) To be worn attached to a leather belt. Northern Oman.

Antique Omani silver Buckles for a boy (Ibsim)

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Antique Omani silver Buckle

 

Common silver buckle. Before a boy is old enough to wear a khanjar, he wears a silver buckle.

 

Omani silver buckle

Arab name: Ibsim

Period: 1900-1950

Origin: worn by boys all over Oman

References:
  1. Ruth Hawley. Omani silver (first edition) page 3
  2. The craft heritage of Oman Volume 2 p. 448 item 079
  3. Oman Adorned by Pauline Shelton Robert Richmond / Apex London 1997 page 112
  4. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 page 24
  5. Disappearing treasures of Oman 1998 by Avelyn Foster page 89, 91
  6. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz p 145
  7. British Museum similar item: 2009,6023.192; Length: 11.5 centimetres (including small buckle); Width: 4.7 centimetres; Weight: 93 grammes; Silver belt-buckle (ibzim) for boys up to the age of 10 or 12. Shaped as a rectangle with two pointed ends. Chased decoration on the front with symmetrical patterns of curling vine-leaves enclosed within pentagon-shapes, and a vertical plaque with zigzag decoration in the centre. The back has silver fixings and a smaller buckle (perhaps missing a pin). To be worn attached to a leather belt. Northern Oman.

Antique Omani silver Buckles for a boy (Ibsim)

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Antique Omani silver Buckle

 

Common silver buckle.  Before a boy is old enough to wear a khanjar, he wears a silver buckle.

 Omani silver buckle

Arab name: Ibsim

Period: 1900-1950

Origin: worn by boys all over Oman

References:
  1. Ruth Hawley. Omani silver (first edition) page 3.
  2. The craft heritage of Oman Volume 2 p. 448  item 079 
  3. Oman Adorned by Pauline Shelton  Robert Richmond / Apex London 1997  page 112 
  4. Silver jewellery of Oman by Jehan S Rajab 1997 page 24 
  5.  Disappearing treasures of Oman 1998 by Avelyn Foster p 89, 91
  6. Traditional silver jewelry and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz page 145
  7. British Museum similar item: 2009,6023.192; Length: 11.5 centimetres (including small buckle Width: 4.7 centimetres; Weight: 93 grammes; Silver belt-buckle (ibzim) for boys up to the age of 10 or 12. Shaped as a rectangle with two pointed ends. Chased decoration on the front with symmetrical patterns of curling vine-leaves enclosed within pentagon-shapes, and a vertical plaque with zigzag decoration in the centre. The back has silver fixings and a smaller buckle (perhaps missing a pin). To be worn attached to a leather belt. Northern Oman.

Buckle that is attached to a grown-up´s khanjar

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Buckle

 Rare antique silver buckle that is attached to a grownup´s khanjar, therefore NOT for  a boy.

 

Omani antique silver buckle

Arab name: Ibsim

Period: 1850-1900

Origin: worn by boys all over Oman

References:
  1. Ruth Hawley. Omani silver (first edition) page 3
  2. The craft heritage of Oman Volume 2 p. 448 item 078
  3. Oman Adorned by Pauline Shelton  Robert Richmond / Apex London 1997  page 112 
  4. Disappearing treasures of Oman 1998 by Avelyn Foster pages 89, 91
  5. Traditional silver jewellery and handicrafts from Oman 2009 by Jean Greffioz page 145